The Mesh - strange strangers between life and non-life powder coated metal, mycelium, plexiglas, PVC tubes, humidifiers 2015

The Mesh - strange strangers between life and non-life

powder coated metal, mycelium, plexiglas, PVC tubes, humidifiers

2015

Plastic Coma (skin)  2017  

Plastic Coma (skin) 

2017

 

Resilient Bodies consists of several large ceramic sculptures that conduct heat in order to melt wax and plastic forms displayed on top of them. The wax is also called paraffin, a derivable from petroleum, and extracted through processes that give us energy but also creates products that will outlive us. Over the course of the exhibition these forms and materials transform and morph around scrap leftovers. The work consequently confronts the viewer with several different experiences of time.

 

In a process in which reality has caught up with science fiction, our unrelenting drive of controlling and manipulating our surrounding has lead to a new geological era called the Anthropocene. While the scientific community is debating the epoch’s beginning – the advent of agriculture, the Industrial Revolution, the first nuclear bomb tests, or the more recent expansive growth in human population – they do agree on the defining factor of the new era, namely the human species being the single biggest cause of the ecological processes shaping the planet. From this daunting reality, the sculptures can be read as future fossils of a time where the products of our making still exist long after every other human trace is gone. This image is haunting as it is beautiful. Shiny objects and plastic floating in pools of everlasting detritus. It is an attractive, toxic world. This not the usual apocalyptic vision or a warning of what is to come, but a imaginative visualisation of what is already here, and an exploration of how we relate to the resources of our planet, the materials we create, and what we ultimately leave behind.

 

Untitled ceramics heated with conducting wire, metal, paraffin wax, condensators 2017

Untitled

ceramics heated with conducting wire, metal, paraffin wax, condensators

2017

The Mesh - strange strangers between life and non-life consist of a series of sculptures that contain mycelium, from which mushrooms grow through plastic and metal, accompanied by structures that support a carefully constructed humidification system that creates a moist [humid] atmosphere. Through different material interactions, these sculptures are in process. The work transforms over the duration of the exhibition. The mushrooms grow slowly: a development that cannot be witnessed in one visit. Other interactions are invisible, like the spreading of spores. Over time the spores of the mushrooms infect the space and spread like a disease, while the human body is penetrated by the spores of the mushrooms – and brings them outside of the space.

How to reposition nature as we think it? These sculptures research the contrast between the alien and uncanny artificial yet organic mushroom and industrial and plastic materials. The work is based on a contemplation on the interconnectedness that is involved in the Anthropocene, the dissolving boundaries between machines of production and consumption, and our finite biological nature in order to communicate a view on the uncanny road this evolution is taking. 

Plastic Coma (contagious crust) (after 7 days) 2017

Plastic Coma (contagious crust)

(after 7 days)

2017

Plastic Coma is a serie zombie sculptures that display symptoms of disease that in turn provides them with a sense of agency as they decompose and transform while on display. The works are made out of thick ceramic skins, cast aluminum, and malleable material such as plastic, wax, mineral crystals and epoxy. They balance between the living and non-living in various degrees of coherency and decay, body and thing, solid and melting. One projects human characteristics to the pieces not only due to their texture that invokes skin and tissues, but further through identifying signs of illness, fever, odorous tumors or oozing fluids. It could be said that it is through the repulsive signs of illness that the viewer perceives them as anthropomorphic. The sculptures seem to be infected by an endemic virus that while manifests differently on each piece, it further acts as an organizational principle that creates a shared environment for the works. 

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