Resilient Bodies is a series of ceramic sculptures heat up to a temperature of 80 °C because they are plugged into the electricity network. An electrical conducting circuit is incapsulated into the sculptures which is heated up by the electricity. Due to their hot surface the wax and plastic forms displayed on top of them to melt over the course of several exhibitions. Over the course of the exhibition the wax and plastics transform and morph around scrap leftovers, leaving a thick puddle in which the sculptures seem to bath. In turn forming a landscape populated with the byproducts of manufacturing and industry, as a kind of grim sublime. Their forms remind of some sort of fossils from the future. The paraffin wax and plastics, both derivable from petroleum and oil, refer to the industrial processes that provide us energy but also creates ‘sticky’ materials that will outlive us and disrupts ecosystems. Some wax parts disappear in a matter of a day, other take about over six months. The work consequently confronts the viewer with several different experiences of time. The leaking is visible in one visit, but the materials that are stuck in the wax are only revealed over the course over a longer period of time.

Untitled ceramics heated with conducting wire, metal, paraffin wax, condensators 2017

Untitled

ceramics heated with conducting wire, metal, paraffin wax, condensators

2017

 

Plastic Coma (sweating piece), detail ceramics, aluminum, peltier cooler, vitryl tubes, pump, epoxy clay 2017

Plastic Coma (sweating piece), detail

ceramics, aluminum, peltier cooler, vitryl tubes, pump, epoxy clay

2017

Tidal Spill is a series of four ceramic sculptures from which chemical crystals grow on the surface over the course of several exhibitions. The sculptures are holding a solution inside that is being absorbed by the ceramic skin, leaving it to crystalize over a period that can take up to many years. Their skin-like ceramic surfaces display signs of fever, tumors and rashes, as if infected with a virus. These changes are the result of mechanical and chemical interventions and perform and transform while being exhibited and even when they are stored. They defy the expectations of permanence typically associated with sculpture. Ultimately, Tidal Spill operates as a living system in which individual sculptural components interact with one another in ways that exceed human mediation. These processes grow beyond any control, aiming to disrupts the distinction between living and non-living. The works speculates what nature or our environment might look like in a distant future where humans have disappeared but synthetic materials such as plastics, aluminum, rubber, and other artificial, non-biodegradable chemicals continue to exist.

Terminal Beach, installation view Rijksakademie OPEN  ceramics, iron II sulphate, aluminum, water cooler, vitryl tubes, pump, epoxy clay, special developed scent dispersed by compressor 2018

Terminal Beach, installation view Rijksakademie OPEN 

ceramics, iron II sulphate, aluminum, water cooler, vitryl tubes, pump, epoxy clay, special developed scent dispersed by compressor

2018

Terminal Beach contains of three large scale ceramic sculptures from which chemical crystals grow on the surface over the course of several exhibitions. The sculptures are holding a solution that is being absorbed by the ceramics, leaving it to crystalize over a period that can take up to many years. Onto three large ceramic sculptures through which chemical crystals grow, ‘sweating’ aluminum braces are mounted. The aluminum parts are connected to a cooling system that cools the aluminum down, so they contract moist from the air. This moist than is collected by the sculptures, feeding the growth of the crystals over time. The sculpture continuously transforms throughout the exhibition, growing, leaking and crystallizing. They form an intimately connected system: when one oozes a chemical substance, others respond with surface oxidation and crystallization. The sculptural elements live off of each other and the space around it, as parasites, displaying an infectious and uncanny landscape. 

Hot Hatching Scrapers ceramics, iron II sulphate 2019

Hot Hatching Scrapers

ceramics, iron II sulphate

2019

Ivory Dampers is a large sculpture existing out of five ceramic pieces from which iron II sulphate crystals form on the surface. The sculptures are holding this mineral solution that is being absorbed by the ceramics, leaving crystals to grow over the course of the exhibition. This is the first sculpture with this behaviour that is being presented in a public domain, directly responding to the weather conditions during the exhibition of Lustwarande, Tilburg (NL). The tranformation is determined by the humidity in the air and vaporation due to the heat from the sun, leaving a thick furry crystallized skin on the surface after a misty or rainy day, displaying an infectious and uncanny landscape over time. During this exhibition the iron II sulphate absorbed by the ceramics has been reacting with the chemical components in ‘acid rain’ causing the sculpture to change colour permanently. After six months Ivory Dampers has been adjusted to be presented in the Stedelijk Museum, Schiedam (NL). Where as the sculpture in the first phases was growing a furry texture, the mineral currently grows stalactites.

Ivory Dampers, detail  ceramics, stainless steel, iron II sulphate 2020

Ivory Dampers, detail 

ceramics, stainless steel, iron II sulphate

2020

Plastic Coma is a series of two sculptures researching metabolism by enforcing signs of in materials like ceramics, epoxy clay and aluminum. Their texture invokes skin and tissues, but further through identifying signs of fever and oozing fluids. The aluminum components ‘sweat’, due to the formation of condense on the surface of the sculpture. The aluminum parts are connected to a cooling system that cools the aluminum down. In relation to the temperature of the room droplets for on the surface, leaking down over the course of the exhibition.

The sculptures balance between the living and non-living in various degrees of coherency and decay, body and thing, solid and melting. They seem to be infected by an endemic virus that while manifests differently on each piece, it further acts as an organizational principle that creates a shared environment for the works.

Tidal Spill, detail ceramics, potassium dichromate, stainless steel, silicon rubber, vitryl tubes, special developed scent dispersed by compressor 2018

Tidal Spill, detail

ceramics, potassium dichromate, stainless steel, silicon rubber, vitryl tubes, special developed scent dispersed by compressor

2018

Built with Berta.me

Isabelle Andriessen ©